Palindromes and palindromedaries around the world, Middle East view
Palindromes and palindromedaries around the world, Middle East view.

Palindromes alphabetical

Check out the latest palindromes by Franklin's Palindromedary members!

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  • Go home, Delia
    Trucker trek curtailed
    Emo! Hog!
    - Trucker Poet, © 12:39 14 Aug 2020
    Time: half-hour. I started with trucker, naturally, and I used the palindrome composer. I was surprised by the words available for the split rek-curt. I chose trek for the left word, which made a short palindrome right off the bat! Then I played with the words starting with curt. I liked curtailed because it made sense; an organized convoy of truckers on a trek that got cancelled.
    
    What I had:  Delia trucker trek curtailed.
    
    Going beyond that was harder. Since the words were all complete, I had to find new ones to expand the sentence. I noticed that "trucker trek curtailed" felt poetic and it could be the middle of a haiku. A haiku palindrome would be cool, so I went with that flow.
    
    With Delia on the first line of the haiku, and the trek cancelled, it just occurred to me that maybe a trek organizer would start telling the drivers the bad news. "Go home" felt like a good phrase, and to my surprise it worked just as well in reverse. I'll let you figure out what the last line means. After all, art is in the eye of the beholder.
    
    And that was it. Finished. As people used to say where I grew up, "It ain't perfect, but it's good enough."
  • I'm a giros origami.
    - Ray N. Franklin, © 13:55 19 Dec 2019
    Seed:  origami
    Time:  30 minutes
    
    Starting from the seed origami, the first line below almost leapt off the screen. I chose the im-a-giro split. Though the contraction "I'm" is not in the Palindromedary, it was an obvious possibility. Both giro and giros were in the words list for the right fragment. Originally, giro was short for autogiro, an early precursor to the helicopter. Some also use that spelling for the Greek sandwich, properly called a gyros. Though I spent half an hour trying to expand the palindrome, the first line remains the best.
    
    * I'm a giros origami
    * llama I'm a giros origami a mall
    * Alive! I'm a giros origami evil A.
    * Liam, I'm a giros origami, mail
    * Liana, I'm a giros origami, a nail.
    * Sega, listen. I'm a giros origami, net silage's
    * Mao, listen. I'm a giros origami, net Siloam
    * So, listen. I'm a giros origami, net silos.
    
    This palindrome wrapped up my experiment. I managed to produce four palindromes in two hours and twenty minutes, spaced out over half a day, an unqualified success in my opinion.
    
    Origami was also the springboard for a poem containing three more palindromes. With another hour of work, I had a poem in four quatrains, an enigma of mi, and a plurality of palindromes. I'm saving that poem for a future publication, probably the first Palindromedary anthology.
  • Krab-mealworm-wasted, a cadet saw Mr. Owla embark.
    - Ray N. Franklin, © 09:23 19 Dec 2019
    Seed:  wasted
    Time:  20 minutes
    
    I started this on the verbs list and landed on wasted. The rest followed fairly quickly. I strongly associate the word cadet with sailing ships, and mealworms with the hardtack sailors ate. Going with the nautical (or maybe spacefaring) theme, the word embark seemed like a good way to expand "em". Krab naturally follows, which is a marketing term for fake crabmeat. I liked the image of a cadet drunk on whatever makes Krab mealworms tolerable. Perhaps the combination ferments without any further assistance.
    
    * wasted det saw
    * wasted a cadet saw
    * mealworm wasted a cadet saw Mr. Owla em
    * Krab-mealworm-wasted, a cadet saw Mr. Owla embark.
    
    This was the first palindrome I composed during an experiment to see how many I could create in a relatively short amount of time.
  • "One-ton knot, Eno."
    "One big knot, Tonk."
    "Gibe?"
    "No."
    "One-ton knot, Eno."
    - Ray N. Franklin, © 19:02 19 Jul 2020
    Seed:  wonton
    Time:  15 minutes
    
    I was testing some code and entered the classic palindrome, "Wonton, not now!" As so often happens, a couple of random perverse thoughts popped up.
    
    One was to add a k between wonton and not: Wonton knot, now! The other told me to replace the homophone won with one. That lead to another short palindrome.
    
    One-ton knot, Eno.
    
    Then I played around with the natural response a person might have to a one-ton knot: "That's one big knot." The last three words completed the excercise and I had a conversation between a couple of friends admiring an example of post-Gordian conspicuous consumptionism.
  • Pu, can I snort celeb electrons in a cup?
    - Ray N. Franklin, © 13:24 14 Dec 2020
    Time:  15 minutes
    Seed:  electrons
    
    Browsing the Main list, I saw the entry for electrons. The reverse split stood out:  snort-cele. At the very least, I wanted to know how many words ended with snort so I entered electrons into the Word Explorer field in Palindrome Composer. Then I selected the snort-cele split. 
    
    So how many words end in snort? Just one, snort, but that was enough. I wrote "electrons snort cele" in the Current Composition field. Somehow that didn't sound useful, so I reversed the phrase to "snort cele electrons" and saw a possibility. The first word that begins with cele is celeb. I added the b to the end of cele and got "snort celeb electrons." That's a truly surreal phrase. It also solved the doubled-letter in the middle problem. Now the palindrome isn't quite so obviously symmetrical. But I didn't want to stop there.
    
    Playing around, I expanded the phrase to "I snort celeb electrons i." For no particular reason I expanded the right side to the word inactive. Then the left side became evitcani and I added some spaces to make "evit can I snort celeb electrons inactive?"
    
    That sounded unsatisfying, and, the only word ending in evit is the name Levit. Dropping evit, I looked at the remainder and came up with "can I snort celeb electrons in a c," which has a nice grammatical flow. Randomly trying cup for the last word, I decided it was finished. "Pu, can I snort celeb electrons in a cup?"
    
    Pu is a name and also the atomic symbol for Plutonium, a rich source of electrons, both ordinary and celebrity.
  • Rail set is a sites liar
    - Kris Rickards, © 10:51 29 Dec 2020
    This palindrome is inspired by those trainsets you get and ignore as child, but become obsessed with as a retired Grandfather. These old men in their attics and sheds create this idyllic landscapes in the most minutiae detail based upon the sceneries invented by their rose tinted nostalgia. But as Simone Signoret said in 1975, "nostalgia isn't what it used to be," and they are missing the truth of history.
    
    Old men hobbyists,
    And young novelists
    Create their own little worlds.
    
    Based on reality
    Letting their mind flee
    A power of God unfurled. 
    
    But it isn't true
    Skies aren't always blue
    Quaint, peaceful and full of bliss
    
    These make believe lands
    Crafted by many hands
    by men who just need a kiss.
    
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